back to top

Both Politicians and Job Seekers Need to Walk the Talk

Stuart Mease
Stuart Mease

It seems every candidate running for office talks about how they are going to create jobs for their constituents. Politicians do not create jobs. Businesses do.

However, companies are not in the business of creating jobs; rather companies exist to create profits. If a company can be more profitable with fewer people, then it will. If a company can realize a return on the investment in creating a job, then it will. Profitability is the goal and job creation is the by-product.

When will the political conversation evolve from creating jobs to creating profitable companies? Clearly, job talk equates to votes. Let’s put propaganda aside, and instead focus on real economic prosperity for our region.

But it’s not just politicians who must be held accountable, it’s job seekers too. In a recent job fair in Roanoke, there were 30-plus companies in attendance with a total of 600+ jobs available. Media outlets indicate how there are no jobs, but clearly there are. But are job seekers willing to fill jobs that exist?

One employer whose 50 available jobs involved phone sales in the collection industry received a no thank you comment from an unemployed worker. “That does not sound good. I will just stay at home and collect my unemployment, and oh by the way, will you please sign my form saying I talked to you about a job so I can keep getting paid to stay at home?”

The tough questions for job seekers to answer – that few will ask – (1) are job seekers willing to acquire the skill sets needed to do the available jobs, (2) are job seekers willing to take their less than ideal job, and (3) are they willing and capable to create their own job through an entrepreneurial start up? Our region desperately needs all job seekers to answer yes to these questions, especially the latter.

We need to hold our politicians accountable, as well as those they are elected to serve. Let’s ask our political candidates to create tax incentives for new and existing small businesses – and those willing to invest in them – and reduce government regulation of the private sector. Let’s ask our fellow citizens to commit to lifelong learning, temporarily take jobs they are overqualified to perform, and think more about creating their own job through entrepreneurship.

Together we all have a responsibility to walk the talk.

By Stuart Mease
[email protected]

Latest Articles

- Advertisement -Fox Radio CBS Sports Radio Advertisement

Latest Articles

- Advertisement -Fox Radio CBS Sports Radio Advertisement

Related Articles